Dating some one at your workplace

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However, employers may have another opinion on the matter. What Are the Potential Pitfalls of Employee Romances?

Many employers see the idea of employees dating one another as potentially threatening productivity or even opening up too much liability for the employer. First, let’s look at some of the most common reasons employers may desire to curb employees’ desire for one another.

A stunning 20% of people who told Career Builder that they had dated someone at the office admitted that at least one person in the relationship was married.

Perhaps that makes sense given the amount of time we spend at work: In an office relationship, you can relate to the struggles someone faces from 9 to 5, says Brownlee.

According to a Payscale office romance report, 15% of the 42,000 respondents said they would date someone they work with.

And one out of five people who gave romance with a coworker a shot ended up marrying their relationship private.

After firing CEO Dov Charney last month, American Apparel decided to update its company code of ethics with stricter guidelines regarding interoffice relationships.

According to the new policy, “No management-level employee may make sexual advances, welcome or unwelcome, toward any subordinate.”Considering Charney’s time with the company was riddled with allegations of sexual harassment, it’s no surprise that the company wants to take a more conservative approach to fraternization.

Instead, other areas of the law, such as discrimination, drug testing, and harassment laws, protect an employee's off-duty conduct. I recently tried to get promoted to a managerial position but I was denied because I would be supervising my husband.

And a whopping 31% of office relationships result in marriage—meaning they can't always be a bad idea, right?

Here's how to make sure pursuing love won't cost you your job: Avoid Getting Involved with the Wrong Person According to the Career Builder survey, 24% of intra-office relationships were with someone higher up in the organization.

Dana Brownlee, president of professional training development company Professionalism Matters, advises against initiating a romance with your manager, or, likewise, with anyone who reports to you directly or indirectly."If you're a manager, you should be held to a higher standard," she says.

"You're creating a climate where people are going to see bias whether there really is bias or not."Relationships with your peers are generally more acceptable—assuming they're unhitched.

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